Prescription Required
In stock
Manufacturer
VALEANT
SKU
24208091055

erythromycin 0.5% eye ointment

Generic
$10.42 / tube
$19.01 / tube
$8.59 / tube
+ -
1,000 tubes Available
Total Price:

Uses

Bacterial Ophthalmic Infections

Erythromycin is used topically in the treatment of superficial infections of the eye involving the conjunctiva and/or cornea caused by susceptible bacteria.

Chlamydial Ophthalmic Infections

Treatment

Erythromycin has been used topically in the treatment of trachoma. The most widely used therapy for trachoma is topical treatment with erythromycin, tetracycline (no longer commercially available in the US), or sulfacetamide ointment, or oral erythromycin or a tetracycline. Oral azithromycin also is effective. Systemic anti-infective therapy (e.g., oral erythromycin, azithromycin, doxycycline) is used for the treatment of chlamydial conjunctivitis; data to support use of topical anti-infectives, in conjunction with systemic therapy, are not available.

Prophylaxis

Infants born to women with untreated chlamydial infection are at high risk for infection; however, prophylaxis is not currently recommended for such infants. Efficacy of topical prophylaxis for the prevention of chlamydial neonatal conjunctivitis has not been established. Chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum and other chlamydial infections require systemic treatment (e.g., oral erythromycin); topical anti-infective therapy alone is inadequate for the treatment of chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum and is unnecessary when appropriate systemic anti-infective therapy is given.

Prophylaxis of Gonococcal Ophthalmia Neonatorum

Erythromycin is used topically for prophylaxis of gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend topical prophylaxis against gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum in all neonates as soon as possible after birth (regardless of whether they are delivered vaginally or by cesarean section), and such prophylaxis is required by law in most states. Although diagnosis and treatment of gonococcal infections in pregnant women is the best means of preventing neonatal gonococcal disease, not all women receive prenatal care. The CDC states that universal topical prophylaxis is warranted since it can prevent sight-threatening gonococcal ophthalmia and because it is safe, easy to administer, and inexpensive.

The CDC and AAP currently recommend use of topical erythromycin, topical tetracycline (no longer commercially available in the US), or topical silver nitrate for prophylaxis of gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum. Topical erythromycin and topical tetracycline appear to be as effective as 1% silver nitrate topical solution in preventing gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum and reportedly produce lower incidences of local irritation than 1% silver nitrate topical solution; however, some state or local public health regulations may still require the prophylactic use of silver nitrate rather than other anti-infectives. Topical silver nitrate may be preferred for the prevention of gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum in areas where the incidence of penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) is relatively high.

Infants born to women with untreated gonorrhea are at high risk of infection with N. gonorrhoeae and should receive systemic prophylaxis (e.g., ceftriaxone) in addition to the usual topical prophylaxis. If gonococcal ophthalmia is diagnosed in the neonate, systemic therapy (e.g., ceftriaxone) is necessary; topical anti-infective therapy alone is inadequate for the treatment of gonococcal ophthalmia and is unnecessary when appropriate systemic anti-infective therapy is given.

For systemic use of erythromycin, see the Erythromycins General Statement 8:12.12.04. For other topical uses of erythromycin, see Erythromycin 84:04.04.

Dosage and Administration

Erythromycin is applied topically to the eye in the form of a 0.5% ointment. As with all ophthalmic ointments, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the tip of the ointment tube.

Bacterial Ophthalmic Infections

For the treatment of superficial infections of the eye caused by susceptible organisms, a ribbon of erythromycin ophthalmic ointment approximately 1 cm in length should be applied to the infected eye(s) up to 6 times daily.

Chlamydial Ophthalmic Infections

For the treatment of trachoma, a small amount of ophthalmic ointment should be applied to each eye twice daily for 2 months or twice daily for the first 5 days of each month for 6 months.

Prophylaxis of Gonococcal Ophthalmia Neonatorum

For prophylaxis of gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum, a ribbon of erythromycin ophthalmic ointment approximately 1 cm in length should be placed in the lower conjunctival sacs of neonates shortly after birth. The eyelids are then massaged gently to spread the ointment; after one minute, excess ointment can be wiped away with sterile cotton. The ointment should not be flushed from the eye following application.

Erythromycin prophylaxis should be performed shortly after birth; delaying prophylaxis for as long as 1 hour after delivery to facilitate parent-infant bonding is unlikely to affect efficacy. Neonates delivered by cesarean section as well as those delivered by the vaginal route should receive prophylaxis. A new tube or single-use container of erythromycin ointment should be used for each neonate.

Cautions

Adverse Effects

Rarely, sensitivity reactions, ocular irritation, or redness occur following application of erythromycin ophthalmic ointment.

Precautions and Contraindications

Erythromycin is contraindicated in patients who have demonstrated hypersensitivity to it. The use of erythromycin may result in overgrowth of nonsusceptible organisms including fungi. If superinfection occurs during erythromycin therapy, the drug should be discontinued and appropriate therapy initiated.

Pharmacokinetics

Topical application of erythromycin probably does not produce significant antibacterial concentrations in deep layers of the cornea or in the aqueous humor. It is not known if erythromycin is absorbed to any substantial extent from mucous membranes.

Write Your Own Review
You're reviewing:ERYTHROMYCIN 0.5% EYE OINTMENT
Your Rating