Total Cost
Free shipping on all orders

Powered by GeniusRx

minocycline 50 mg capsule generic minocin

Out of Stock Manufacturer TORRENT PHARMAC 13668048201
Out of Stock

Dosage and Administration

Reconstitution and Administration

Minocycline hydrochloride is administered orally. Minocycline has been administered IV, but a parenteral preparation no longer is commercially available in the US.

Minocycline hydrochloride capsules, pellet-filled capsules, or film-coated tablets should be administered at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals. The manufacturer of Dynacin capsules states that the capsules may be taken with or without food. Although the effect appears to be variable, concomitant administration with food and/or milk can decrease the rate and extent of absorption of minocycline by up to about 27%.(See Effect of Food or Milk under Pharmacokinetics: Absorption.)

To reduce the risk of esophageal irritation and ulceration, minocycline hydrochloride capsules and film-coated tablets should be administered with adequate amounts of fluid and probably should not be given at bedtime or to patients with esophageal obstruction or compression. The pellet-filled capsules should be swallowed whole.

Dosage

Dosage of minocycline hydrochloride is expressed in terms of minocycline.

General Adult Dosage

The usual adult oral dosage of minocycline is 200 mg initially, followed by 100 mg every 12 hours. Alternatively, if more frequent doses are preferred, adults may receive 100-200 mg of minocycline initially, followed by 50 mg 4 times daily.

General Pediatric Dosage

The usual oral dosage of minocycline for children older than 8 years of age is 4 mg/kg initially, followed by 2 mg/kg every 12 hours.

For information on the use of minocycline hydrochloride for the treatment of periodontitis, see Minocycline 52:04.04.

Acne

In the adjunctive treatment of inflammatory acne vulgaris unresponsive to other oral anti-infectives (tetracycline hydrochloride, erythromycin), 50 mg of minocycline has been given orally 1-3 times daily.

Chlamydial Infections

For the treatment of nongonococcal urethritis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis or Ureaplasma urealyticum, the manufacturers state that adults can receive oral minocycline in a dosage of 100 mg every 12 hours for at least 7 days.

Doxycycline is the tetracycline recommended by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the treatment of nongonococcal urethritis and also is the preferred tetracycline for the presumptive treatment of coexisting chlamydial infections in patients with gonorrhea.

Gonorrhea and Associated Infections

The manufacturers state that uncomplicated gonorrhea (other than urethritis and anorectal infections in men) may be treated with 200 mg of oral minocycline initially, followed by 100 mg every 12 hours for a minimum of 4 days; follow-up cultures should be done within 2-3 days after completion of therapy. For the treatment of uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in adult males, the manufacturers state that the recommended dosage of oral minocycline is 100 mg every 12 hours for 5 days.

Tetracyclines are not included in current CDC guidelines for the treatment of gonorrhea, and doxycycline is the preferred tetracycline for presumptive treatment of coexisting chlamydial infections in patients with gonorrhea.

Mycobacterial Infections

Leprosy

For the treatment of multibacillary leprosy in adults who cannot receive rifampin because of adverse effects, intercurrent disease (e.g., chronic hepatitis), or infection with rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends supervised administration of a regimen of clofazimine (50 mg daily), ofloxacin (400 mg daily), and minocycline (100 mg daily) given for 6 months, followed by a regimen of clofazimine (50 mg daily) and minocycline (100 mg daily) given for at least an additional 18 months.

For the treatment of multibacillary leprosy in adults who will not accept or cannot tolerate clofazimine, the WHO recommends supervised administration of a once-monthly rifampin-based multiple-drug regimen (ROM) that includes rifampin (600 mg once monthly), ofloxacin (400 mg once monthly), and minocycline (100 mg once monthly) given for 24 months.

For the treatment of single-lesion paucibacillary leprosy in certain patient groups, the WHO currently states that adults may receive a single-dose rifampin-based multiple-drug regimen (ROM) that includes a single 600-mg dose of rifampin, a single 400-mg dose of ofloxacin, and a single 100-mg dose of minocycline.

For the treatment of single-lesion paucibacillary leprosy in pediatric patients, the WHO recommends that children 5-14 years of age receive a single 300-mg dose of rifampin, a single 200-mg dose of ofloxacin, and a single 50-mg dose of minocycline. Children younger than 5 years of age should receive an appropriately adjusted dose of each drug.

For additional information on the treatment of leprosy, , , and .

Mycobacterium marinum Infections

The manufacturers state that optimum dosage has not been established, but granulomas of the skin caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been successfully treated with 100 mg of oral minocycline every 12 hours for 6-8 weeks. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) recommends that oral minocycline be given in a dosage of 100 mg twice daily for at least 3 months for the treatment of cutaneous M. marinum infections and states that a minimum of 4-6 weeks of therapy is necessary to determine whether or not the infection is responding.

Neisseria meningitidis Infections

N. meningitidis Carriers

To eliminate meningococci from the nasopharynx of asymptomatic Neisseria meningitidis carriers in situations in which the risk of meningococcal meningitis is high, the manufacturers state that 100 mg of oral minocycline may be given every 12 hours for 5 days.

The CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) currently recommend other anti-infective agents (i.e., rifampin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin) for chemoprophylaxis in close contacts of individuals with invasive meningococcal disease.

Nocardiosis

For the treatment of nocardiosis, the usual dosage of oral minocycline has been given in conjunction with a sulfonamide for 12-18 months.

Pleural Effusions

When used intrapleurally as a sclerosing agent to control pleural effusions associated with metastatic tumors, 300 mg of minocycline reportedly has been diluted with 40-50 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride injection and instilled into the pleural space through a thoracostomy tube, followed by clamping of the tube and subsequent removal of the fluid.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

When used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, adults have received oral minocycline in a dosage of 100 mg twice daily. A benefit may be evident 1-3 months after initiation of minocycline therapy.

Syphilis

The manufacturers state that the usual dosage of oral minocycline may be given for 10-15 days for the treatment of syphilis; close follow-up and laboratory tests are recommended.

Parenteral penicillin G is the drug of choice for all stages of syphilis and doxycycline or tetracycline hydrochloride are the tetracyclines recommended by the CDC for the treatment of primary, secondary, latent, or tertiary syphilis in nonpregnant adults, adolescents, and children 8 years of age or older who are hypersensitive to penicillin.

Vibrio Infections

Cholera

For the treatment of cholera in conjunction with fluid and electrolyte replacement, an initial 200-mg oral dose of minocycline has been given followed by 100-mg oral doses every 12 hours for 48-72 hours.

Dosage in Renal Impairment

In patients with renal impairment, doses and/or frequency of administration of minocycline should be decreased in response to the degree of impairment. Some manufacturers state that dosage of oral minocycline should not exceed 200 mg daily in patients with impaired renal function.

Cautions

Adverse CNS effects (e.g., vestibular reactions) occur more frequently with minocycline than with other currently available tetracyclines. The true incidence of these adverse effects has not been determined. Previously, vestibular symptoms were reported to occur in up to 21% of patients treated with minocycline. However, recent studies indicate that these reactions may occur in 30-90% of patients treated with usual dosages of minocycline. For a more complete discussion of these and other cautions associated with the use of minocycline, .

Pharmacokinetics

In all studies described in the Pharmacokinetics section, minocycline was administered as the hydrochloride salt.

Absorption

Approximately 90-100% of an oral dose of minocycline hydrochloride is absorbed from the GI tract in fasting adults. Peak serum concentrations usually are attained within 1-4 hours.

Following oral administration of a single 200-mg dose of minocycline powder- or pellet-filled capsules in fasting adults with normal renal function, peak serum concentrations of the drug are attained within 1-4 hours (average 2.1 hours) and range from 2.1-5.1 mcg/mL (average 3.5 mcg/mL). In one study in adults with normal renal function given an initial 200-mg oral dose of minocycline as powder-filled capsules followed by 100-mg oral doses every 12 hours, steady-state serum concentrations of minocycline averaged 2.3-3.5 mcg/mL.

Following oral administration of a single 100-mg dose of minocycline as tablets in healthy, fasting adults, peak serum concentrations were attained in 1-3 hours (average 1.7 hours) and ranged from 0.5-1.3 mcg/mL (average 0.8 mcg/mL).

Because tetracyclines readily chelate divalent or trivalent cations including aluminum, calcium, iron, and magnesium, concurrent oral administration of antacids or other drugs containing these cations may decrease oral absorption of minocycline hydrochloride.

Effect of Food or Milk

Food and/or milk can decrease the rate and extent of absorption of oral minocycline hydrochloride.

In one study in healthy adults, administration of a single 100-mg dose of minocycline with food resulted in a 13% decrease in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of the drug compared with administration with water. When the same dose was administered with milk, there was a 27% decrease in the AUC compared with administration with water.

When healthy adults received pellet-filled capsules of minocycline following a standardized meal containing dairy products, peak plasma minocycline concentrations were decreased 11.2% and delayed by approximately 1 hour compared with administration in the fasting state; however, the extent of absorption (as represented by the AUC) was similar in fed and fasting individuals.

When minocycline hydrochloride tablets were given concomitantly with a meal containing dairy products, there was a 12% decrease in peak plasma concentrations, a 1-hour delay in peak concentrations, and a 6% decrease in the extent of absorption of the drug.

Elimination

The serum half-life of minocycline is 11-26 hours in adults with normal renal function. In one study, the half-life was reported to be about 17 hours after a single dose and 21 hours after multiple doses.

In a limited number of patients with hepatic dysfunction, the serum half-life of minocycline reportedly ranged from 11-16 hours. Although results of studies using minocycline in patients with renal impairment are conflicting, most studies indicate that the serum half-life of the drug is not significantly affected by alterations in renal function. In patients with severe renal impairment, the serum half-life of minocycline is generally reported to be 12-30 hours following single or multiple doses.

In patients with normal renal function, approximately 4-19% of a single oral dose of minocycline is excreted in urine and 20-34% is excreted in feces within 72 hours as active drug. Some studies indicate that minocycline, unlike other currently available tetracyclines, is partially metabolized to at least 6 metabolites.

Write Your Own Review

Your meds on autopilot. Forever.